by Darcia Helle

In 1870, New Orleans was a city divided by politics, class, and race. The Civil War had left much of the south reeling, and now the government’s Radical Reconstruction attempted to force change by integrating the black population into the white-dominated hierarchy. Some whites rebelled, clinging to their Confederate roots, while others who supported the change suffered ridicule and disdain within their community. The atmosphere was tumultuous. Racism was not only openly practiced but encouraged.

Former United States Supreme Court Justice John Campbell, who resigned in order to join the Confederacy, illustrates this point well. He had this to say to his fellow New Orleanians: “We have Africans in place all about us, they are jurors, post office clerks, custom house officers & day by day they barter away their obligations and duties.”

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by John W. Taylor

Joanna Madonna moved to the Raleigh, North Carolina area in 2007 with her second husband, three daughters, and elderly father. After divorcing her second husband a couple of years later, Joanna married Jose Perez, a much older and severely ill and disabled Vietnam veteran. Jose’s primary physician, Dr. Robert Falge, described him as “one of the most ill people I have ever seen who was able to continue functioning.” With Jose collecting disability from the government, Joanna periodically taught high school. Though their income was limited, the couple managed to live in several very nice homes in the Raleigh suburbs, primarily due to financial contributions by Joanna’s father.

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by BJW Nashe

When I lived in Santa Cruz, California from 1982-87, I had no idea that this pleasant seaside town was once dubbed “The Murder Capital of the World.” By the time I moved there to attend UC Santa Cruz, where I majored in philosophy (with an unofficial minor in hallucinogens), there was little or no mention of murder. The mass killing had occurred a decade earlier. The only murders I recall were found in existentialist novels by Albert Camus and Fyodor Dostoevsky. I lived a block and half from the sea. We liked to stroll along West Cliff Drive late at night. Everything seemed perfect.

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by John W. Taylor

After a drawn-out battle over money and custody, Drew Peterson finally divorced his third wife, Kathleen Savio, in October of 2003. He married Stacy Cales (“Peterson”) days after he finalized his divorce. On March 1, 2004, a neighbor found Kathleen’s lifeless body curled up in her bathtub. Though several of Kathleen’s family members thought Kathleen may have been a victim of foul play, the autopsy report identified the cause of death as an accidental drowning and the police concurred. That was the end of it until Peterson’s fourth wife, Stacy, went missing.

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review by Patrick H. Moore

I get asked to read a fair number of true crime books. The writers, like writers everywhere, are working hard to promote their creations and are eager for exposure. I hate to say “no” to these requests, but inwardly I sometimes groan as in, “How in the world am I going to find time to read, much less review, another crime book?”

Thus, it was with considerable pleasure and more than a little relief that I discovered that COLD SERIAL: The Jack the Stranglers Murders, by Brain Forschner, provides a fascinating extended snapshot of a string of unprovoked rapes and murders committed in or around Dayton, Ohio between 1900 and 1909. Based on the modus operandi of the killer, the reader comes to the unavoidable conclusion that the murders are the work of a single cold-hearted killer, what today we would term a serial killer.

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by Patrick H. Moore

My best beloveds, well do I remember that dreadful day when I first began running posts on the Amanda Knox – Meredith Kercher case. I was still very much a true crime greenhorn at the time and didn’t realize that — right or wrong — true crime fans are incredibly passionate about the cases they follow. Within minutes of our first posting, we found ourselves in the middle of a shit storm such as I have rarely endured. Oh myfreakin’god, it was nasty.

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by Patrick H. Moore

Those of us who are getting a bit long in the tooth or have even reached the backside of 30 probably remember that unforgettable day when Jared Fogle first burst upon the scene. In 1999, Jared lost 245 pounds in less than a year, going from an alarming 425 pounds with a 60″ waist to 180 pounds with a 34″ waist.

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by Patrick H. Moore

You are a three-year-old girl and you live in a house in a place called Mascotte. You also live in a place called Florida which you understand is bigger than Mascotte so you don’t know where it starts and where it ends. Your house is on a busy road and sometimes you and your mom walk along the busy road on the way to your grandmother’s house. Because the road is busy, your mom walks on the outside close to the traffic while you walk on the inside away from the cars. Your mom holds your hand and sometimes she picks you up and carries you.

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by Patrick H. Moore

Great Good News, Dear Friends and Comrades. Thanks to a wise Federal judge in Newark, New Jersey, the 900 pound stone that has been sitting on Patrick H’s (and by extension All Things Crime Blog’s) head ever since the blog and Old Man Mo’ were sued by an angry person who insisted Moore and the blog were guilty of libel and defamation, has been rolled away and Moore and All Things Crime Blog are breathing a sigh of relief. Please join me in a toast of celebration.

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Overview:

Jerry Bledsoe’s series of critically acclaimed true crime sagas, originally published in the late 1980s and 90s, have been made into various movies (including Before He Wakes and Honor Thy Mother) and now television shows (Bitter Blood has inspired a new episode of Killer Couples on the Oxygen Network), but until recently, the books have been hard to find in print, and unavailable in ebook. After coming across four of Bledsoe’s titles last year, however, Diversion Books decided to bring the books back into publication with a series of re-releases in ebook. Now, at long last, three of Bledsoe’s best titles with be available in print on July 28th, alongside the bestselling Bitter Blood in ebook.

Before He Wakes, Blood Games, and Death Sentence deal with some of the most chilling domestic murders in the history of crime, and delve into the twisted minds of the murderers who wore masks of sanity that fooled even those closest to them. The books will be available on Amazon, B&N, and other online retailers.

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